Active Mode Logo style

Public Engagement in Experiential Futures



Archive
Future of Malls

Diversity is becoming a broader concept beyond one’s ethnic background. When Canada describes itself as “diverse”, we often think of one’s ethnic background. However, we are a leader in other diversity issues, such as gay and transgender rights. Now, new forms of diversity are being accepted, such as neurodiversity and physical abilities, which paints a richer picture of what diversity in Canada looks like. It’s not just about accepting different ethnicities, but different ways of thinking and being.

Read More

Many demographic studies have charted how suburbs are becoming more and more colourful, welcoming large numbers of minorities and recent immigrants. Suburbs are now being designed to meet the needs of highly diverse communities. For example, nearly three out of every four Markham residents claim “visible minority” status, with more than a third of the population hailing from China. Other sizable groups include South Asians, Arabs, Koreans and Filipinos.

Read More

The rate at which Canada’s population is aging is accelerating with significant economic, social and political implications. The Canadian population is aging at a rapid rate with projections showing that the total and proportion of Canadians 65+ and 80+ will increase significantly in the near future. The population growth rate for those 64 and over is increasing around four times faster than the population at large, and the population of people 65 and older is now larger than the number of children under 15. The number of “community-dwelling” seniors is also rapidly increasing.

Read More

61% of peak millennial survey respondents across Canada would prefer to buy a detached home, only 36% believe that they will realistically be able to find a property within this market segment (2017 national survey). Consequently, many within this age range have adjusted their expectations and have become increasingly open to other property types, provided that they are move-in ready. Over half of those surveyed would look to the suburbs when purchasing a property, especially when it comes time to raise a family, as the supply of new developments and spacious residences are more abundant in these areas. In addition, 61% stated that they would be willing to move to another city or suburb where property is more affordable.

Read More

Local policymakers are beginning to reassess land use and zone restrictions to see how big box retail “greyzones” can be reimagined as denser mixed-use developments that residents and city managers want. Benefits of mixed-use zoning include lower infrastructure costs, increased tax revenue, and operating budget savings. One such example is the Greenline development in Calgary, which is a mash-up of residential and commercial.

Read More

Suburban sprawl continues to increase as real estate prices in urban cores are still to costly for many Canadians to move into. While this may still be the case, some of the amenities and design elements of urban centres are finding their way to the suburbs. This includes walkable neighborhoods, more dense main streets, and mass transit connections.

Read More

Type: Social, Environmental

To improve individual neighbourhoods and boost overall regional performance, there has been a movement towards designing for Complete Communities. Elements of complete communities include a quality education, access to good jobs, an affordable roof over our heads, access to affordable healthy food and health services, the ability to enjoy artistic, spiritual and cultural amenities, access to recreation and parks, meaningful civic engagement, and affordable transportation choices that get us where we need to go. (Reconnecting America, 2012)

Read More