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Public Engagement in Experiential Futures



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The Canadian government has developed extra social programs to help newcomers from climate disaster zones but because of the growing exponential complexity of the crisis, many newcomers are falling through the cracks. Many have found this as an opportunity to develop informal networks where newcomers can develop support networks for themselves. While some have found this as a way to cope with the sometimes inefficient support from the government, others use these networks as a platform for commercial exploitation.

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Increased climate change in the form of radical weather events and rising water levels continues to displace people on an exponential level across the world. Canada continues to act as a beacon for refugees through their public sponsorship program but the government is failing to catch up and support the amount of refugees entering the country. Some Canadian citizens see this as a drain of their resources and fail to see how refugees are contributing to Canadian society.

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Because of ever growing informal economies, policing agencies have started to turn a blind eye to light precarious work done in public (ie: street vendors and shops without business licenses). They have however, started to plant agents into newcomer communities in order to crack down on the growing underground cybercrime gang networks in Toronto.

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Year after year, summer temperatures have hit record highs putting great strains on Toronto’s energy networks to provide power to cooling systems. Many of the newcomer communities and local Torontonians who do not have the resources to combat the heat migrate to cooler public commercial spaces. This provides opportunities for cultural communities to come together but it also creates conflicts between newcomer communities and those who think they pose a strain on the system.

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Stress from unstable, and often unfulfilling precarious work takes its toll on newcomers who are not only adjusting to a new environment, but must regularly compete for job opportunities to provide for themselves and their families. Discrimination arising from disdain over Canada’s openness to accept refugees also ironically make the settlement experience difficult. Mental health of newcomers are immensely affected, and the Government’s automated social service system does not account for such qualitative subtleties.

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